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Activity theory in HCI : fundamentals and reflections / Victor Kaptelinin, Bonnie Nardi.

By: Contributor(s): Material type: TextTextSeries: Synthesis lectures on human-centered informatics ; #13.Publication details: Cham, Switzerland : Springer, c2012.Description: 1 online resource ( x, 95 pages) : illustrationsContent type:
  • text
Media type:
  • computer
Carrier type:
  • online resource
ISBN:
  • 9781608457052
  • 1608457052
  • 9783031021961
  • 3031021967
Other title:
  • Activity theory in human-computer interaction
Subject(s): Additional physical formats: Print version:: Activity theory in HCI.DDC classification:
  • 004.019 23
LOC classification:
  • QA76.9 .H85 K37 2012
Online resources:
Contents:
Preface -- 1. Introduction: Activity theory and the changing face of HCI -- Theory in HCI -- The objectives of the book -- Activity theory in HCI: Selected contributions -- Re-framing HCI concepts -- Conceptual tools for design and evaluation -- Theoretical lens -- Some reflections for students.
2. Basic concepts and principles of activity theory -- Introduction -- The general notion of activity -- The origins of activity theory: Russian psychology of the 1920s and 1930s -- Lev Vygotsky and the social nature of human mind -- The individual/collective dimension: The dynamics of the social distribution of the mind -- From inter-psychological to intra-psychological -- Sergei Rubinshtein and the principle of unity and inseparability of consciousness and activity -- The concept of activity and the evolution of psyche -- The structure of human activity -- Needs, motives, and the object of activity -- Activities, actions, and operations -- Functional organs -- Basic principles of Leontiev's activity theory: An overview -- Engeström's activity system model -- Current diversity of activity theoretical frameworks.
3. Agency -- A typology of agents -- Artifacts -- Conclusion.
4. Activity and experience -- Introduction -- Analyses of subjective phenomena in activity theory -- Activity theoretical vs. phenomenological perspectives on experience in HCI.
5. Activity-centric computing -- A historical account of activity-centric computing -- Activity-centric computing and activity theory -- Current issues and prospects for future research in activity-centric computing -- A variety of perspectives in activity-centric computing -- Design challenges and solutions -- Evaluating activity-centric technologies and environments.
6. Activity theory and the development of HCI -- Introduction -- hn-HCI -- Time, space, scope -- Activity theory and hn-HCI -- Conclusion.
Bibliography -- Authors' biographies.
No physical items for this record

Includes bibliographical references (pages 79-94).

Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, MI Available via World Wide Web.

Online resource; title from PDF title page (Morgan & Claypool, viewed Sept. 27, 2012).

Preface -- 1. Introduction: Activity theory and the changing face of HCI -- Theory in HCI -- The objectives of the book -- Activity theory in HCI: Selected contributions -- Re-framing HCI concepts -- Conceptual tools for design and evaluation -- Theoretical lens -- Some reflections for students.

2. Basic concepts and principles of activity theory -- Introduction -- The general notion of activity -- The origins of activity theory: Russian psychology of the 1920s and 1930s -- Lev Vygotsky and the social nature of human mind -- The individual/collective dimension: The dynamics of the social distribution of the mind -- From inter-psychological to intra-psychological -- Sergei Rubinshtein and the principle of unity and inseparability of consciousness and activity -- The concept of activity and the evolution of psyche -- The structure of human activity -- Needs, motives, and the object of activity -- Activities, actions, and operations -- Functional organs -- Basic principles of Leontiev's activity theory: An overview -- Engeström's activity system model -- Current diversity of activity theoretical frameworks.

3. Agency -- A typology of agents -- Artifacts -- Conclusion.

4. Activity and experience -- Introduction -- Analyses of subjective phenomena in activity theory -- Activity theoretical vs. phenomenological perspectives on experience in HCI.

5. Activity-centric computing -- A historical account of activity-centric computing -- Activity-centric computing and activity theory -- Current issues and prospects for future research in activity-centric computing -- A variety of perspectives in activity-centric computing -- Design challenges and solutions -- Evaluating activity-centric technologies and environments.

6. Activity theory and the development of HCI -- Introduction -- hn-HCI -- Time, space, scope -- Activity theory and hn-HCI -- Conclusion.

Bibliography -- Authors' biographies.

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